Biotechnology and Health Sciences Biotechnology and Health Sciences Biotech Health Sci http://www.Biotech-health.portal.tools 2383-0271 2383-028X 10.5812/bhs en jalali 2021 5 10 gregorian 2021 5 10 In Press In Press
en 10.17795/bhs-34332 Preparation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody Against Truncated Recombinant Nuclear Matrix Protein (NMP22) Preparation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody Against Truncated Recombinant Nuclear Matrix Protein (NMP22) research-article research-article Background

Bladder cancer is a major worldwide health problem. Diagnosis of acute and chronic bladder carcinoma is based on the detection of a number of tumor markers such as nmp22 (nuclear matrix protein 22). Nmp22 is one of the tumor markers used for detecting the recurrence of bladder cancer.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to develop hybrid cell producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specifically for nmp22 using hybridoma technology.

Materials and Methods

Complete and incomplete adjuvant with recombinant truncated nmp22 antigens were emulsified and injected to BALB/c mice. The spleen was removed and the splenocytes were fused with sp2/0 myeloma cells. Characterization of the produced mAb was carried out.

Results

As a result of the fusion, hybridoma cells were produced and exhibited high- titer antibodies. By testing of colons based on the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), 135 hybridoma colons were selected, out of which eight high titer clones including 54D-6F-2E-36-7H-2A-8E-1D-6D were detected and one of the clones named FPR92 was selected, and the produced mAb was further characterized. The produced antibody belongs to the IgG class and its light chain was kappa. With respect to affinity, the mAb was included as high affinity 3 × 10-7 reacting with NMP22 recombinant protein .The western blot of cancerous bladder tissue showed the presence of 40 and 55 kD proteins as major bands that reacted with this mAb.

Conclusions

Based on a double limiting dilution protocol, a type of monoclonal antibody, named FPR92 was produced and characterized.

Background

Bladder cancer is a major worldwide health problem. Diagnosis of acute and chronic bladder carcinoma is based on the detection of a number of tumor markers such as nmp22 (nuclear matrix protein 22). Nmp22 is one of the tumor markers used for detecting the recurrence of bladder cancer.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to develop hybrid cell producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specifically for nmp22 using hybridoma technology.

Materials and Methods

Complete and incomplete adjuvant with recombinant truncated nmp22 antigens were emulsified and injected to BALB/c mice. The spleen was removed and the splenocytes were fused with sp2/0 myeloma cells. Characterization of the produced mAb was carried out.

Results

As a result of the fusion, hybridoma cells were produced and exhibited high- titer antibodies. By testing of colons based on the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), 135 hybridoma colons were selected, out of which eight high titer clones including 54D-6F-2E-36-7H-2A-8E-1D-6D were detected and one of the clones named FPR92 was selected, and the produced mAb was further characterized. The produced antibody belongs to the IgG class and its light chain was kappa. With respect to affinity, the mAb was included as high affinity 3 × 10-7 reacting with NMP22 recombinant protein .The western blot of cancerous bladder tissue showed the presence of 40 and 55 kD proteins as major bands that reacted with this mAb.

Conclusions

Based on a double limiting dilution protocol, a type of monoclonal antibody, named FPR92 was produced and characterized.

Nmp22;Hybridoma;mAb;FPR92;Characterization Nmp22;Hybridoma;mAb;FPR92;Characterization http://www.Biotech-health.portal.tools/index.php?page=article&article_id=34332 Mahsa Faghihi Mahsa Faghihi Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Malihe Paknejad Malihe Paknejad Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Reza Sarookhani Mohammad Reza Sarookhani Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833336001, Fax: +98-2833345862 Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833336001, Fax: +98-2833345862 Sepideh Soukhtehzari Sepideh Soukhtehzari Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Hamed Zare Hamed Zare Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Hosein Gahremani Hosein Gahremani Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Javad Rasaee Mohammad Javad Rasaee Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-40117 Trend of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Patients with Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection Under Treatment Trend of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Patients with Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection Under Treatment research-article research-article Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI), and to analyze bacteriological and clinical findings.

Methods

In a prospective study, 187 patients with UTI and suggestive signs and symptoms were included. History of UTI and clinical findings were recorded. Urine specimens were cultured and analyzed for pyuria by sediment microscopy and nitrite using a test strip. The systemic inflammatory response was assessed by ESR, and total white blood cell count.

Conclusions

This study showed that ESR and clinical findings were not interchangeable indexes of patient’s condition, although they are concordant (both normal and both abnormal) in the vast majority of patients. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate is frequently misleading in patients with UTI and is not responsive to changes in the patient’s condition. Checking ESR is recommended not earlier than six days after starting UTI treatment, if necessary.

Results

Escherichia coli accounted for 62.2% of the urinary isolates. Most UTI patients showed a decline three days after treatment, whereas some had an increased ESR response at this time (despite improvements in clinical symptoms). Overall, ESR on the sixth day was determined to be a better marker for response to symptomatic UTI treatment than the third day ESR.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI), and to analyze bacteriological and clinical findings.

Methods

In a prospective study, 187 patients with UTI and suggestive signs and symptoms were included. History of UTI and clinical findings were recorded. Urine specimens were cultured and analyzed for pyuria by sediment microscopy and nitrite using a test strip. The systemic inflammatory response was assessed by ESR, and total white blood cell count.

Conclusions

This study showed that ESR and clinical findings were not interchangeable indexes of patient’s condition, although they are concordant (both normal and both abnormal) in the vast majority of patients. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate is frequently misleading in patients with UTI and is not responsive to changes in the patient’s condition. Checking ESR is recommended not earlier than six days after starting UTI treatment, if necessary.

Results

Escherichia coli accounted for 62.2% of the urinary isolates. Most UTI patients showed a decline three days after treatment, whereas some had an increased ESR response at this time (despite improvements in clinical symptoms). Overall, ESR on the sixth day was determined to be a better marker for response to symptomatic UTI treatment than the third day ESR.

Urinary Tract Infections;Signs and Symptoms;Inflammation;ESR Urinary Tract Infections;Signs and Symptoms;Inflammation;ESR http://www.Biotech-health.portal.tools/index.php?page=article&article_id=40117 Saeideh Makarem Saeideh Makarem Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Abbas Allami Abbas Allami Faculty of Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833379630 Faculty of Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833379630 Navid Mohammadi Navid Mohammadi Department of Community Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Preventive Medicine and Public Health Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Community Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Preventive Medicine and Public Health Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-38779 Determination of Gap in Accreditation Standards Establishment Process Using Zachman Framework at a Health-Educational Hospital Determination of Gap in Accreditation Standards Establishment Process Using Zachman Framework at a Health-Educational Hospital research-article research-article Conclusions

Uncertainties in the accreditation standards in dimensions of purpose, people involved, strategy and time interval of doing work, respectively, led to a lack of understanding the intention of author/developers of standards by personnel. As a result, this led to lack of complete establishment of accreditation standards in the studied hospital.

Results

People involved in doing work and sub-systems of doing work at the hospital were consistent with specified accreditation standards. In 27% of the standards, time interval of doing work in the hospital was not conducted according to accreditation standards. In terms of way of doing work, 25% of standards had not been established, and 26% of them had been established incompletely. During interviews, it was found that 59% of personnel of purpose of doing work, and 94% of them are not informed about the strategy of doing work, according to accreditation standards in the hospital.

Methods

This descriptive research was conducted during year 2015. The population of the study included people involved in the establishment of accreditation standards. Sampling was conducted in the form of complete enumeration according to 36 standards of accreditation. The instrument used for data collection was the “Logical framework of Zachman”. Columns of framework consisted of people involved in conducting the work (Who), the purpose of the work (Why), strategy of the work (What), work time (When), and sub-system of doing work (Where) and way of doing work (How), and rows of framework included the view of hospital chief, director/assistants of hospital, officials and personnel. Test chi-square was used to compare between accreditation standards text and studied hospital gap. Descriptive statistical method was used for variables.

Background

Accreditation is usually a voluntary plan supported by a non-governmental institution and trained evaluators that examine the competency of organizations providing health service according to pre-specified performance standards.

Objectives

The current study aimed to determine the degree of establishment of accreditation standards using logical framework of Zachman.

Conclusions

Uncertainties in the accreditation standards in dimensions of purpose, people involved, strategy and time interval of doing work, respectively, led to a lack of understanding the intention of author/developers of standards by personnel. As a result, this led to lack of complete establishment of accreditation standards in the studied hospital.

Results

People involved in doing work and sub-systems of doing work at the hospital were consistent with specified accreditation standards. In 27% of the standards, time interval of doing work in the hospital was not conducted according to accreditation standards. In terms of way of doing work, 25% of standards had not been established, and 26% of them had been established incompletely. During interviews, it was found that 59% of personnel of purpose of doing work, and 94% of them are not informed about the strategy of doing work, according to accreditation standards in the hospital.

Methods

This descriptive research was conducted during year 2015. The population of the study included people involved in the establishment of accreditation standards. Sampling was conducted in the form of complete enumeration according to 36 standards of accreditation. The instrument used for data collection was the “Logical framework of Zachman”. Columns of framework consisted of people involved in conducting the work (Who), the purpose of the work (Why), strategy of the work (What), work time (When), and sub-system of doing work (Where) and way of doing work (How), and rows of framework included the view of hospital chief, director/assistants of hospital, officials and personnel. Test chi-square was used to compare between accreditation standards text and studied hospital gap. Descriptive statistical method was used for variables.

Background

Accreditation is usually a voluntary plan supported by a non-governmental institution and trained evaluators that examine the competency of organizations providing health service according to pre-specified performance standards.

Objectives

The current study aimed to determine the degree of establishment of accreditation standards using logical framework of Zachman.

Accreditation;Establishment;Gap;Hospitals;Tehran Accreditation;Establishment;Gap;Hospitals;Tehran http://www.Biotech-health.portal.tools/index.php?page=article&article_id=38779 Saeed Asefzadeh Saeed Asefzadeh Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Jahanara Mamikhani Jahanara Mamikhani Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Elahe Navvabi Elahe Navvabi Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9124121556, Fax: +98-2877555189 Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Department of Health Service Management, Faculty of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9124121556, Fax: +98-2877555189
en 10.17795/bhs-42050 Quality of Working Life and Its Association with Organizational Performance: A Model Applied for Healthcare Workers Quality of Working Life and Its Association with Organizational Performance: A Model Applied for Healthcare Workers research-article research-article Conclusions

Attention paid to QWL led to an increase in organizational performance. Thus, managers could improve their workforce performance through promoting QWL.

Results

Study findings revealed a significant direct relationship between QWL and organizational performance (P < 0.05). Furthermore, all QWL aspects (fair and adequate payment: r = 0.288, safe and healthy working environment: r = 0.286, opportunity for growth and continuous security: r = 0.604, legalism in the organization: r = 0.515, social dependency of working life: r = 0.445, overall life condition: r = 0.343, social integration: r = 0.538 and development of human capabilities: r = 0.648) were significantly associated with organizational performance (P < 0.05).

Methods

This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted among healthcare workforce of Ardakan in Iran in 2016. Two-hundred sixty staff, working in healthcare centers, emergency departments and city health network participated in this study; the census method was used. To collect data, two questionnaires related to QWL (Walton) and organizational performance (ACHIEVE Model) were used. Data analysis was done using SPSS 18 and descriptive statistical tests and Pearson correlation.

Background

High quality working environment has been known as an essential condition for strengthening human resources in the healthcare system. Given the important effect of working life quality on staff performance, this study was conducted to assess the relationship between quality of working life (QWL) and organizational performance in healthcare and medical centers of Ardakan, Yazd, in 2016.

Conclusions

Attention paid to QWL led to an increase in organizational performance. Thus, managers could improve their workforce performance through promoting QWL.

Results

Study findings revealed a significant direct relationship between QWL and organizational performance (P < 0.05). Furthermore, all QWL aspects (fair and adequate payment: r = 0.288, safe and healthy working environment: r = 0.286, opportunity for growth and continuous security: r = 0.604, legalism in the organization: r = 0.515, social dependency of working life: r = 0.445, overall life condition: r = 0.343, social integration: r = 0.538 and development of human capabilities: r = 0.648) were significantly associated with organizational performance (P < 0.05).

Methods

This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted among healthcare workforce of Ardakan in Iran in 2016. Two-hundred sixty staff, working in healthcare centers, emergency departments and city health network participated in this study; the census method was used. To collect data, two questionnaires related to QWL (Walton) and organizational performance (ACHIEVE Model) were used. Data analysis was done using SPSS 18 and descriptive statistical tests and Pearson correlation.

Background

High quality working environment has been known as an essential condition for strengthening human resources in the healthcare system. Given the important effect of working life quality on staff performance, this study was conducted to assess the relationship between quality of working life (QWL) and organizational performance in healthcare and medical centers of Ardakan, Yazd, in 2016.

Quality of Working Life (QWL);Organizational Performance;ACHIEVE Model;Health Workforce Quality of Working Life (QWL);Organizational Performance;ACHIEVE Model;Health Workforce http://www.Biotech-health.portal.tools/index.php?page=article&article_id=42050 Roohollah Askari Roohollah Askari Department of Health Services Management, School of Public Health , Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Department of Health Services Management, School of Public Health , Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Sima Rafiei Sima Rafiei Department of Health Management, School of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Department of Health Management, School of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Razieh Montazerolfaraj Razieh Montazerolfaraj Department of Health Services Management, School of Public Health , Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Department of Health Services Management, School of Public Health , Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Arefeh Dehghani Tafti Arefeh Dehghani Tafti Department of Statistics, School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Department of Statistics, School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Foozieh Torabi Foozieh Torabi School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran; School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran. Tel: +98-9125262737, Fax: +98-3538209119 School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran; School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran. Tel: +98-9125262737, Fax: +98-3538209119
en 10.5812/bhs.45306 Biodegradation of Endosulfan as an Organochlorine Pesticide with Pseudomonas plecoglocissida Transfected by LinA Gene Biodegradation of Endosulfan as an Organochlorine Pesticide with <italic>Pseudomonas plecoglocissida</italic> Transfected by <italic>LinA</italic> Gene research-article research-article Conclusions

Ability of transfected Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain in biodegradation of chemicals makes it an excellent candidate for bioremediation of contaminated agricultural and industrial sites.

Results

In endosulfan supplemented carbon-deficient minimal medium, the isolate showed its ability to hydrolyze endosulfan to endosulfan sulphate. The isolate was observed to grow on endosulfan as the carbon source. Thus, the strain was capable of degrading the OC pesticides and utilizing products of their degradation as nutrients.

Background

Organochlorine pesticides (OC) are applied to soil and agricultural farms and can contaminate sewerage and ditches, which in turn may be transported to rivers, and consequently distributed in the environment and as a pollutant that endangers human health.

Objectives

This study aimed at constructing a genetically engineered Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain enabled to degrade the OC pesticide, endosulfan.

Methods

Transfected Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain was initially made in the following steps, first polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product of gene LinA from Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26 was transferred to the pUC57 plasmid, and the plasmid was then transfected to P. plecoglossicida.

Conclusions

Ability of transfected Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain in biodegradation of chemicals makes it an excellent candidate for bioremediation of contaminated agricultural and industrial sites.

Results

In endosulfan supplemented carbon-deficient minimal medium, the isolate showed its ability to hydrolyze endosulfan to endosulfan sulphate. The isolate was observed to grow on endosulfan as the carbon source. Thus, the strain was capable of degrading the OC pesticides and utilizing products of their degradation as nutrients.

Background

Organochlorine pesticides (OC) are applied to soil and agricultural farms and can contaminate sewerage and ditches, which in turn may be transported to rivers, and consequently distributed in the environment and as a pollutant that endangers human health.

Objectives

This study aimed at constructing a genetically engineered Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain enabled to degrade the OC pesticide, endosulfan.

Methods

Transfected Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain was initially made in the following steps, first polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product of gene LinA from Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26 was transferred to the pUC57 plasmid, and the plasmid was then transfected to P. plecoglossicida.

Organochlorine;Biodegradation;Pseudomonas plecoglossicida Organochlorine;Biodegradation;Pseudomonas plecoglossicida http://www.Biotech-health.portal.tools/index.php?page=article&article_id=45306 Masoumeh Aslani Mehr Masoumeh Aslani Mehr Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Taghi Naserpour Farivar Taghi Naserpour Farivar Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular research center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Shahid Bahonar Blv., Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833324971, Fax: +98-2833324971 Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular research center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Shahid Bahonar Blv., Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833324971, Fax: +98-2833324971 Reza Najafipour Reza Najafipour Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Amir Peymani Amir Peymani Medical Microbiology Research Center,Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Medical Microbiology Research Center,Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Safar Ali Alizadeh Safar Ali Alizadeh Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Pouran Johari Pouran Johari Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran